Staff prefer this perk to high salaries

by Emily Douglas16 May 2018

Money or satisfaction; would employees rather take home a higher salary in a job they hate or make a moderate paycheque in a role they thrive in?

A study from Indeed has found that the majority of employees aren’t motivated solely by their salaries, as just 12% of those asked cited it as an important factor in their job.

In fact, most workers are not primarily motivated by money in their careers, with 21% adding that ‘having a good relationship’ with colleagues, whilst 24% rate actually enjoying the job as the deciding factor.

Despite this focus on satisfaction over money – over half of employees don’t believe they’re paid ‘appropriately’, suggesting they’re willing to trade salary for happiness.

A further 67% of workers would reapply for a position in an organization following an unsuccessful interview – with 65% of candidates listing ‘speed of response’ from an employer as the most important step to establishing employer-employee trust.

“Job satisfaction or fulfilment is a complex idea to pin down, and for each person it’s invariably driven by a mix of factors,” said Bill Richards, MD at Indeed.

“Yet it’s striking to learn that the vast majority of Britons are not motivated primarily by how much a job pays.”

Two thirds of employees admitted to returning down jobs if they were made aware of negative aspects of the company – despite having gone through a successful interview.

“Jobseekers are looking for the all-round package of what a company can offer, and employers should note the continuing power of word of mouth in influencing how people feel about where they work,” continued Richards.

“Employers who are more attentive from the start of the application process, both in terms of speed of response and in the detail of their communication, are far more likely to leave a positive and lasting impression on jobseekers that will in turn translate into a happier workplace.”

 

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Money woes affecting employee engagement

 

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